What to love or hate about the Seahawks day three selections and acquisitions

The Seahawks had a busy second-day, Pete Carroll drafted some players high-upside, and trade for two running backs that could add depth to the offense, but also will compete for starting jobs.

Carroll also took some risks on players, both of those runningbacks included, but this year’s draft was one where character played a huge role in players’ draft positions.

Here is who the Seahawks acquired today, and what you should love or hate about each of them.

Traded Pick No. 139 to New York Jets for Leon Washington

What to love:

Leon Washington, when healthy, is one of the most dynamic players in the NFL. He has world class speed, and he can catch the ball out of the backfield. Over his four year career he averages almost five yards per carry and has 123 receptions. The Jets tendered Washington with an offer that would have brought a second-round pick back to them had any team signed Washington to an offer sheet, but the Seahawks ultimately got him for a fifth round pick.

What to hate:

Last year Washington’s season ended with a gruesome leg break. He suffered a compound fracture to his fibula, and his recovery is questionable. He’s never carried the full load, and won’t be asked to in Seattle. His injury makes him a risk, but the scarier part, is that the Jets used the pick to draft the Terminator.

Swapped fourth and sixth rounders (No. 104 and No. 176) for LenDale White, Kevin Vickerson and picks No. 111 and No. 185

What to love:

When he wants to be, White is a punishing back who will run through tackles and will be great on the goal line. He has limited pounding on his body after touching the ball only 67 times last year. He’s familiar with Pete Carroll, and became a highly-touted college prospect under the coach.

Vickerson is another body to plug into the rotation at defensive tackle, and he can play end when the Seahawks use a three-man front.

What to hate:

White has had spotty work ethic, and has shown some attitude problems throughout his brief career in Tennessee. He’s never averaged over four yards per carry in a season and his weight remains a constant concern.

Vickerson has started only two games in his career. His pass rush production is limited (1.5 Sacks, 4 pass defenses in 3 years with the Titans) but his play has also been limited, playing in only 24 games since being drafted by the Dolphins in 2005.

No. 111 Walter Thurmond, CB, Oregon

What to love:

If Thurmond was healthy, he’d have been valued much higher.  A knee injury gave Seattle the opportunity to draft Thurmond in the fourth round. He won’t just be depth, Thurmond will be given every opportunity to earn a starting spot, and even at reduced athleticsm, he’ll be able to function in a Cover-Two.

What to hate:

Thurmond could use some bulk, but not at the expense of his athleticism or recovering knee. Frankly, the biggest knock on Thurmond is that injured knee.

No. 127 E.J. Wilson, DE, North Carolina

What to love:

Wilson’s height weight and speed are a tick behind the paradigm of the most successful defensive ends in football. He is a great athlete and has great size to stuff the run. He’s also big enough to rotate inside on passing downs and won’t have to leave the field when the Seahawks employ their hybrid 3-4, because he’s big enough to play end in the scheme.

What to hate:

He’s a bit of a project, he comes from good coaching (Butch Davis). If he can put it all together he can be a productive defensive end, but that is a big if.

No. 133 Kam Chancellor, S, Virginia Tech

What to love:

Chancellor’s height, weight, and speed (6-3, 231 lbs, 4.59 Pro Day 40 time) indicate a safety who can fly around and make some big hits. With Earl Thomas in Seattle he won’t be asked to cover much, and can likely help out in run support and deep zone coverage.

What to hate:

He can’t cover slot receivers, and many running backs and tight ends who run good routes will give Chancellor problems also.

No. 185 Anthony McCoy, TE, USC

What to love:

On ability alone, McCoy is a steal in the sixth round. He’s a willing blocker, a good athlete, and can catch the ball. A lot of people had him in the third round before character concerns cropped up. He’s familiar with Carroll and Jeremy Bates.

What to hate:

McCoy tested positive for marijuana at the combine. With Pete Carroll as his guide, he showed up to the biggest job interview of his life and peed dirty. What makes us think that Carroll can reel him in the pros?

No. 236 Dexter Davis, DE/OLB, Arizona State

What to love:

There obviously hasn’t been wholesale changes to the team’s draft strategy, as for the second straight year the team drafted an undersized pass-rush specialist from the Pac-10. Last year Nick Reed became a cult hero, expect the same from Davis if he puts together a good preseason.

What to hate:

Davis fits the scheme strangely. He can play outside in a 3-4, but may be undersized for even that, and will struggle with his hand on the ground. Cannot play run downs on the line, and will not be asked to cover.

No. 245 Jameson Konz, WR, Kent State

What to love:

Konz is a tremendous athlete according to his pro day numbers (4.41 40 yard dash, 46 inch vertical, 10-8 broad jump). Pro day results are almost always inflated, but it is hard to inflate a vertical with scouts watching. Konz is a great athlete who needs to refine his skills, as he’s been very unproductive.

What to hate:

Konz will have to spend his first year on the practice squad, in all likelihood. We’ve spent the last few years waiting for similarly athletic Jordan Kent to put together something that would resemble a receivers repertoire of routes, and have been disappointed.